Formalization and Creativity as Strongly Singular Terms

February 16, 2012 § Leave a comment

Formalization is based on the the use of symbols.

In the last chapter we characterized formalization as a way to give a complicated thing a symbolic form that lives within a system of other forms.

Here, we will first discuss a special property of the concepts of formalization and creativity, one that they share for instance with language. We call this property strong singularity. Then, we will sketch some consequences of this state.

What does “Strongly Singular” mean?

Before I am going to discuss (briefly) the adjacent concept of “singular terms” I would like to shed a note on the newly introduced term of “strong singularity”.

The ordinary Case

Let us take ordinary language, even as this may be a difficult thing to theorize about. At least, everybody is able to use it. We can do a lot of things with language, the common thing about these things is, however, that we use it in social situations, mostly in order to elicit two “effects”: First, we trigger some interpretation or even inference in our social companion, secondly, we indicate that we did just that. As a result, a common understanding emerges, formally taken, a homeomorphism, which in turn then may serve as the basis for the assignment of so-called “propositional content”. Only then we can “talk about” something, that is, only then we are able to assign a reference to something that is external to the exchanged speech.

As said, this is the usual working of language. For instance, by saying “Right now I am hearing my neighbor exercising piano.” I can refer to common experience, or at least to a construction you would call an imagination (it is anyway always a construction). This way I refer to an external subject and its relations, a fact. We can build sentences about it, about which we even could say whether they correspond to reality or not. But, of course, this already would be a further interpretation. There is no direct access to the “external world”.

In this way we can gain (fallaciously) the impression that we can refer to external objects by means of language. Yet, this is a fallacy, based on an illegitimate shortcut, as we have seen. Nevertheless, for most parts of our language(s) it is possible to refer to external or externalized objects by exchanging the mutual inferential / interpretational assignments as described above. I can say “music” and it is pretty clear what I mean by that, even if the status of the mere utterance of a single word is somewhat deficient: it is not determined whether I intended to refer to music in general, e.g. as the totality of all pieces or the cultural phenomenon, or to a particular piece, to a possibility of its instantiation or the factual instance right now. Notwithstanding this divergent variety, it is possible to trigger interpretations and to start a talk between people about music, while we neither have to play or to listen to music at that moment.

The same holds for structural terms that regulate interpretation predominantly by their “structural” value. It is not that important for us here, whether the externalization is directed to objects or to the speech itself. There is an external, even a physical justification for the starting to engage in the language game about such entities.

Something different…

Now, this externalization is not possible for some terms. The most obvious is “language”. We neither can talk about language without language, nor can we even think “language” or have the “feeling” of language without practicing it. We also can’t investigate language without using or practicing it. Any “measurement” about language inevitably uses language itself as the means to measure, and this includes any interpretation of speech in language as well. This self-referentiality further leads to interesting phenomena, such as “n-isms” like the dualism in quantum physics, where we also find a conflation of scales. If we would fail to take this self-referentiality into consideration we inevitably will create faults or pseudo-paradoxa.

The important issue about that is that there is no justification of language which could be expressed outside of language, hence there is no (foundational) justification for it at all. We find a quite unique setting, which corrodes any attempt for a “closed” , i.e. formal analysis of language.

The extension of the concept “language” is at the same time an instance of it.

It is absolutely not surprising that the attempt for a fully mechanic, i.e. apriori determined or algorithmic analysis of language must fail. Wittgenstein thus arrived at the conclusion that language is ultimately embedded as a practice in the life form [1] (we would prefer the term “performance” instead). He demanded, that justifications (of language games as rule-following) have to come to an end1; for him it was fallacious to think that a complete justification—or ultimate foundation—would be possible.

Just to emphasize it again: The particular uniqueness of terms like language is that they can not be justified outside of themselves. Analytically, they start with a structural singularity. Thus the term “strong singularity” that differs significantly from the concept of the so-called “singular term” as it is widely known. We will discuss it below.

The term “strong singularity” indicates the absence of any possibility for an external justification.

In §329 of the Philosophical Investigations, Wittgenstein notes:

When I think in language, there aren’t ”meanings” going through my mind in addition to the verbal expressions: the language is itself the vehicle of thought.

It is quite interesting to see that symbols do not own this particular property of strong singularity. Despite that they are a structural part of language they do not share this property. Hence we may conceive it as a remarkable instance of a Deleuzean double articulation [2] in midst thinking itself. There would be lot to say about it, but it also would not fit here.

Further Instances

Language now shares the property of strong singularity with formalization .  We can neither have the idea nor the feeling of formalization without formalization, and we even can not perform formalization without prior higher-order formalization. There is no justification of formalization which could be expressed outside of formalization, hence there is no (foundational) justification for it at all. The parallel is obvious: Would it then be necessary, for instance, to conclude that formalization is embedded in the life form much in the same way as it is the case for language? That mere performance precedes logics? Precisely this could be concluded from the whole of Wittgenstein’s philosophical theory, as Colin Johnston suggested [3].

Per­forma­tive activity precedes any possibility of applying logics in the social world; formulated the other way round, we can say that transcendental logics is getting instantiated into an applicable quasi-logics. Before this background, the idea of truth functions determining a “pure” or ideal truth value is rendered into an importunate misunder­standing. Yet, formali­zation and language are not only similar with regard to this self-referentiality, they are also strictly different. Nevertheless, so the hypothesis we try to strengthen here, formalization resembles language in that we can not have the slightest thought or even any mental operation without formalization. It is even the other way round, in that any mental operation invokes a formalizing step.

Formalization and language are not the only entities, which exhibit self-referentiality and which can not defined by any kind of outside stance. Theory, model and metaphor belong to the family, too, not to forget finally about thinking, hence creativity, at large. A peculiar representative of these terms is the “I”. Close relatives, though not as critical as the former ones, are concepts like causality or information. All these terms are not only self-referential, they are also cross-referential. Discussing any of them automatically involves the others. Many instances of deep confusion derive from the attempt to treat them separately, across many domains from neurosciences, socio­logy, computer sciences and mathematics up to philosophy. Since digital techno­logies are based seriously on formalization and have been developing yet further into a significant deep structure of our contemporary life form, any area where software technology is pervasively used is endangered by the same misunderstandings. One of these areas is architecture and city-planning, or more general, any discipline where language or the social in involved as a target of the investigation.

There is last point to note about self-referentiality. Self-referentiality may likely lead to a situation that we have described as “complexity”. From this perspective, self-referentiality is a basic condition for the potential of novelty. It is thus interesting to see that this potential is directly and natively implanted into some concepts.

Singular Terms

Now we will briefly discuss the concept of “singular term” as it is usually referred to. Yet, there is not a full agreement about this issue of singular terms, in my opinion mainly due to methodological issues. Many proponents of analytical philosophy simply “forget that there are speaking”, in the sense mentioned above.

The analytical perspective

Anyway, according to the received view, names are singular terms. It is said that the reference of singular terms are singular things or objects, even if they are immaterial, like the unicorn. Yet, the complete distinctive list of singular terms would look like this:

  • – proper names (“Barack Obama”);
  • – labeling designation (“U.S. President”);
  • – indexical expressions (“here”, “this dog”).

Such singular terms are distinguished from so-called general terms. Following Tugendhat [4], who refers in turn to Strawson [5], the significance of a general term F consists from the conditions to be fulfilled, such that F matches one or several objects. In other words, the significance of a singular term is given by a rule for identification, while the significance of a general term is given by a rule for classification. As a consequence, singular terms require knowledge about general terms.

Such statements are typical for analytical philosophy.

There are serious problems with it. However, even the labeling is misleading. It is definitely NOT the term that is singular. Singular is at most a particular contextual event, which we decided to address by a name. Labelings and indexical expressions are not necessarily “singular,” and quite frequently the same holds for names. Think about “John Smith” first as a name, then as a person…  This mistake is quite frequent in analytic philosophy. We can trace it even to the philosophy of mathematics [6], when it comes to certain claims of set theory about infinity.

The relevance for the possibility of machine-based episteme

There can be little doubt, as we already have been expressing it elsewhere, that human cognition can’t be separated from language. Even the use of most primitive tools, let alone be the production and distribution of them, requires the capability for at least a precursor of language, some first steps into languagability.

We know by experience that, in our mother tongue, we can understand sentences that we never heard before. Hence, understanding of language (quite likely as any understanding) is bottom-up, not top-down, at least in the beginning of the respective processes. Thus we have to ask about the sub-sentential components of a sentence.

Such components are singular terms. Imagine some perfectly working structure that comprises the capability for arbitrary classification as well as the capability for non-empirical analogical thinking, that is based on a dynamic symmetries. The machine wold not only be able to perform the transition from extensions to intensions, it would even be able to abstract the intension into a system of meta-algebraic symmetry relations. Such a system, or better, the programmer of it then would be faced with the problem of naming and labeling. Somehow the intensions have to be made addressable. A private index does not help, since such an index would be without any value for communication purposes.

The question is how to make the machine referring to the proper names? We will see elsewhere (forthcoming: “Waves, Words, and Images“), that this question will lead us to the necessity of multi-modality in processing linguistic input, e.g. language and images together into the same structure (which is just another reason why to rely on self-organizing maps and our methodology of modeling).

Refutation of the analytical view

The analytical position about singular term does not provide any help or insight into the the particular differential quality of terms as words that denote a concept.2   Analytical statements as cited above are inconsistent, if not self-contradictory. The reason is simple. Words as placeholders for concepts can not have a particular meaning attached to them by principle. The meaning, even that of subsentential components, is an issue of interpretation, and the meaning of a sentence is given not only by its own totality, it is also dependent on the embedding of the sentence itself into the story or the social context, where it is performed.

Since “analytic” singular terms require knowledge about general terms, and the general terms are only determined if the sentence is understood, it is impossible to identify or classify single terms, whether singular or general, before the propositional content of the sentence is clear to the participants. That propositional content of the sentence, however, is, as Robert Brandom in chapter 6 of his [7] convincingly argues, only accessible through their role in the inferential relations between the participants of the talk as well as the relations between sentences. Such we can easily see that the analytical concept of singular terms is empty, if not self-nullifying.

The required understanding of the sentence is missing in the analytical perspective, the object is dominant against the sentence, which is against any real-life experience. Hence, we’d also say that the primacy of interpretation is not fully respected. What we’d need instead is a kind of bootstrapping procedure that works within a social situation of exchanged speech.

Robert Brandom moves this bootstrapping into the social situation itself, which starts with a medial symmetry between language and socialness. There is, coarsely spoken, a rather fixed choreography to accomplish that. First, the participants have to be able to maintain what Brandom calls a de-ontic account. The sequence start with a claim, which includes the assignment of a particular role. This role must be accepted and returned, which is established by signalling that the inference / interpretation will be done. Both the role and the acceptance are dependent on the claim, on the de-ontic status of the participants and on the intended meaning. (now I have summarized about 500 pages of Brandom’s book…, but, as said, it is a very coarse summary!)

Brandom (chp.6) investigates the issue of singular terms. For him, the analytical perspective is not acceptable, since for him, as it the case for us, there is the primacy of interpretation.

Brandom refutes the claim of analytical philosophy that singular names designate single objects. Instead he strives to determine the necessity and the characteristics of singular terms by a scheme that distinguishes particular structural (“syntactical”) and semantic conditions. These conditions are further divergent between the two classes of possible subsentential structures, the singular terms (ST) and predicates (P). While syntactically, ST take the role of substitution-of/substitution-by and P take the structural role of providing a frame for such substitutions, in the semantic perspective ST are characterised exclusively by so called symmetric substitution-inferential commitments (SIC), where P also take asymmetric SIC. Those inferential commitments link the de-ontic, i.e. ultimately socialness of linguistic exchange, to the linguistic domain of the social exchange. We hence may also characterize the whole situation as it is described by Brandom as a cross-medial setting, where the socialness and linguistic domain provide each other mutually a medial embedding.

Interestingly, this simultaneous cross-mediality represents also a “region”, or a context, where materiality (of the participants) and immateriality (of information qua interpretation) overlaps. We find, so to speak, an event-like situation just before the symmetry-break that we ay identify as meaning. To some respect, Brandom’s scheme provides us the pragmatic details of of a Peircean sign situation.

The Peirce-Brandom Test

This has been a very coarse sketch of one aspect of Brandom’s approach. Yet, we have seen that language understanding can not be understood if we neglect the described cross-mediality. We therefore propose to replace the so-called Turing-test by a procedure that we propose to call the Peirce-Brandom Test. That test would proof the capability to take part in semiosis, and the choreography of the interaction scheme would guarantee that references and inferences are indeed performed. In contrast to the Turing-test, the Peirce-Brandom test can’t be “faked”, e.g. by a “Chinese Room.” (Searle [8]) Else, to find out whether the interaction partner is a “machine” or a human we should not ask them anything, since the question as a grammatical form of social interaction corroborates the complexity of the situation. We just should talk to it/her/him.The Searlean homunculus inside the Chinese room would not be able to look up anything anymore. He would have to be able to think in Chinese and as Chinese, q.e.d.

Strongly Singular Terms and the Issue of Virtuality

The result of Brandom’s analysis is that the label of singular terms is somewhat dispensable. These terms may be taken as if they point to a singular object, but there is no necessity for that, since their meaning is not attached to the reference to the object, but to their role in in performing the discourse.

Strongly singular terms are strikingly different from those (“weakly) singular terms. Since they are founding themselves while being practiced through their self-referential structure, it is not possible to find any “incoming” dependencies. They are seemingly isolated on their passive side, there are only outgoing dependencies towards other terms, i.e. other terms are dependent on them. Hence we could call them also “(purely) active terms”.

What we can experience here in a quite immediate manner is pure potentiality, or virtuality (in the Deleuzean sense). Language imports potentiality into material arrangements, which is something that programming languages or any other finite state automaton can’t accomplish. That’s the reason why we all the time heftily deny the reasonability to talk about states when it comes to the brain or the mind.

Now, at this point it is perfectly clear why language can be conceived as ongoing creativity. Without ongoing creativity, the continuous actualization of the virtual, there wouldn’t be anything that would take place, there would not “be” language. For this reason, the term creativity belongs to the small group of strongly singular terms.

Conclusion

In this series of essays about the relation between formalization and creativity we have achieved an important methodological milestone. We have found a consistent structural basis for the terms language, formalization and creativity. The common denominator for all of those is self-referentiality. On the one hand this becomes manifest in the phenomenon of strong singularity, on the other hand this implies an immanent virtuality for certain terms. These terms (language, formalization, model, theory) may well be taken as the “hot spots” not only of the creative power of language, but also of thinking at large.

The aspect of immanent virtuality implicates a highly significant methodological move concerning the starting point for any reasoning about strongly singular terms. Yet, this we will check out in the next chapter.

Part 1: The Formal and the Creative, Introduction

Part 3: A Pragmatic Start for a Beautiful Pair


Notes

1.  Wittgenstein repeatedly has been expressing this from different perspectives. In the Philosophical Investigations [1], PI §219, he states: “When I obey the rule, I do not choose. I obey the rule blindly.” In other words, there is usually no reason to give, although one always can think of some reasons. Yet, it is also true that (PI §10) “Rules cannot be made for every possible contingency, but then that isn’t their point anyway.” This leads us to §217: “If I have exhausted the justifications I have reached bedrock, and my spade is turned. Then I am inclined to say: ‘This is simply what I do’.” Rules are are never intended to remove all possible doubt, thus  PI  §485: “Justification by experience comes to an end. If it did not it would not be justification.” Later Quine proofed accordingly from a different perspective what today is known as the indeterminacy of empirical reason (“Word and Object”).

2. There are, of course, other interesting positions, e.g. that elaborated by Wilfrid Sellars [9], who distinguished different kinds of singular terms: abstract singular terms (“triangularity”), and distributive singular terms (“the red”), in addition to standard singular terms. Yet, the problem of which the analytical position is suffering also hits the position of Sellars.

  • References
  • [1] Ludwig Wittgenstein, Philosophical Investigations.
  • [2] Gilles Deleuze, Felix Guattari, Milles Plateaus.
  • [3] Colin Johnston (2009). Tractarian objects and logical categories. Synthese 167: 145-161.
  • [4] Ernst Tugendhat, Traditional and Analytical Philosophy. 1976
  • [5] Strawson 1974
  • [6] Rodych, Victor, “Wittgenstein’s Philosophy of Mathematics”, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2011 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), http://plato.stanford.edu.
  • [7] Robert Brandom, Making it Explicit. 1994
  • [8] John Searle (1980). Minds, Brains and Programs. Behav Brain Sci 3 (3), 417–424.
  • [9] Wilfrid Sellars, Science and Metaphysics. Variations on Kantian Themes, Ridgview Publishing Company, Atascadero, California [1967] 1992.

۞

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